Tyler Treat bravenewgeek.com

Multi-cloud is a trap

This is the battle cry that started the Open Container Initiative. But in reality, are/was multi-cloud and vendor lock-in true concerns for software teams? Tyler Treat writes on his personal blog: We want to be cloud-agnostic. We need to avoid vendor lock-in. We want to be able to shift workloads seamlessly between cloud providers. Let me say it again: multi-cloud is a trap. Outside of appeasing a few major retailers who might not be too keen on stuff running in Amazon data centers, I can think of few reasons why multi-cloud should be a priority for organizations of any scale.

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David Cramer Avatar Founders Talk

BONUS: Growing a successful sales team at Sentry

Here's a bonus segment from episode #57 of Founders Talk with David Cramer, co-founder and CEO of Sentry. Check the feed for the full length episode (later today). We talked about sales in the full length episode, but this BONUS segment is a completely isolated conversation that's not included in the full length episode — so don't gloss over this thinking it's just a teaser.

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Tidelift Icon Tidelift – Sponsored

$1M available on Tidelift for open source maintainers

It's time to pay the maintainers! Tidelift now has $1M available on the platform to pay open source maintainers, with guaranteed minimum $10,000 payouts to select projects in the Javascript, Java, Python, PHP, and Ruby ecosystems. How does it work? First, someone purchases the Tidelift Subscription. Then, we scan the subscriber’s open source stack for packages and dependencies. We split up the subscription fee and use it to pay the exact packages they use. In return, subscribers can be confident that those packages are well-maintained. Tidelift provides a comprehensive picture of maintenance, security, and licensing assurances to subscribers. Package income is calculated each month based on subscriber usage. Payment is then sent to maintainers. If you are an open source maintainer and would like to get paid for your work, click here to see estimated monthly income for your package(s).

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Maria Gutierrez blog.gitprime.com

Fundamentals of building and managing distributed engineering teams

I talked with Bryan Helmig about this on Founders Talk #55. He's the co-founder and CTO of a "remote only" company, so that means engineering as well. Yes, you read that right — remote only. Maria Gutierrez (VP of Engineering at FreeAgent), writes on the GitPrime blog: When your company’s headquarters are outside of one of the major tech hubs, you’ll likely hit a point where you realize you simply cannot hire enough developers to work in the main office. A lot of companies need to start considering distributed candidates in order to build the quality crews they need. And if you want those distributed engineers to be successful members of your team for a long time, you’ll need to follow certain best practices right from the get-go. For some, going distributed is a choice. For others, it's a necessity to survive. Which side of the line does your organization stand on this subject?

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link Icon spectrum.ieee.org

LinkedIn reports dramatically increasing shortage of data scientists across U.S.

What a difference a few years makes. In 2015, a LinkedIn snapshot of what it calls the skills gap—a mismatch between the skills workers have and the skills employers seek—showed a national surplus in the United States of people with data science skills; as of August 2018, LinkedIn data shows a dramatic shortage. It's a good time to be alive a Practical AI listener. 😉

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sorrycc umijs.org

UmiJS – a pluggable, enterprise-level React app framework

Umi is based on routing, supports next.js-like conventional routing, and various advanced routing functions, such as routing-level on-demand loading. Then with a complete plugin system, covering every life cycle from source code to build product, umi is able to support various functional extensions and business needs, currently umi have almost 50+ plugins in both community and inside company.

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Yarn github.com

Getting rid of node_modules

The Yarn team is brewing up a new way to resolve dependencies: this RFC a new alternative and entirely optional way to resolve dependencies installed on the disk, in order to solve issues caused by the incomplete knowledge Node has regarding the dependency tree. We also detail the actual implementation we went with, describing the rational behind the design choice we made. Pretty exciting if/when they pull it off. The wins: Installs ran using Plug'n'Play are up to 70% faster than regular ones (sample app) Starting from this PR, Yarn will now be on the path to make yarn install a no-op on CI Yarn will now be able to tell you precisely when you forgot to list packages in your dependencies Your applications will boot faster through a hybrid approach of static resolutions

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

Errors from the world's top 100 websites (and how to avoid them)

Jennifer Marsh writes on the Rollbar blog: When you think of the top 100 sites in the world, you think of high-traffic domains and pages coded to perfection. In fact, even the most popular sites in the world have errors hidden behind the scenes that are still visible in your browser’s developer tools ... We found that most of the top 100 sites had several errors which could be easily monitored and prevented. In this post Jennifer shows you the most common errors faced by the top websites in the world and how you can avoid them.

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The Verge Icon The Verge

Microsoft tests ‘warning’ Windows 10 users not to install Chrome or Firefox

Tom Warren writing for The Verge: Microsoft is testing a warning for Windows 10 users not to install Chrome or Firefox. The software giant is in the final stages of testing its Windows 10 October 2018 Update, and testers have spotted a new change that appears when you try to install a rival web browser. “You already have Microsoft Edge – the safer, faster browser for Windows 10” says a prompt that appears when you run the Chrome or Firefox installers on the latest Windows 10 October 2018 Update. Yes, the update in the article makes it clear that this is only being tested, but to me, that doesn't excuse this type of shady behavior. Why is this being tested in the first place? Unfortunately for Microsoft, invasive and creepy conduct like this will only make people steer clear of its browser and other products.

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Dan Kohn Avatar The Changelog #314

Kubernetes brings all the Cloud Natives to the yard

We talk with Dan Kohn, the Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to catch up with all things cloud native, the CNCF, and the world of Kubernetes. Dan updated us on the growth KubeCon / CloudNativeCon, the state of Cloud Native and where innovation is happening, serverless being on the rise, and Kubernetes dominating the enterprise.

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JavaScript github.com

You probably don't need Moment.js

When you pull in a library dependency, it is rare that you need all of the functionality it offers. This isn't usually a problem for backends, because that code never leaves the server. However, In frontend-land your users pay the price for all that unused functionality every time they hit your website with a cold cache. Moment.js is an excellent date/time library. It is packed with functionality, and you probably don't need everything it has to offer. Instead, check out date-fns, which offers small, highly targeted functions you can probably get by with. There's even an ESLint plugin that will help you identify places in your codebase where you don't really need Moment.js!

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Stephen O'Grady redmonk.com

Tragedy of the Commons Clause

We've been tracking the community's concerns and feedback about Commons Clause fairly well. In this post, Stephen O'Grady basically writes a book on the subject and the impact of this controversial software license. ...the Commons Clause turns open source software into non-open source software, according to the industry’s accepted definition of that term. Specifically it says that the terms of the original open source license notwithstanding, you may not sell software “whose value derives, entirely or substantially, from the functionality of the Software.” ...there are several logical questions to explore regarding the Commons Clause. What are the drivers behind it? What does it mean for the companies that employ it and the wider industry? And lastly, is it a good idea? Set aside 20 minutes and read this if you care about how this license is becoming popular among those (Redis as of recent) who are protecting their right to generate revenue from their open source code, while removing that ability for everyone else.

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Daniele Polencic learnk8s.io

What is Kubernetes?

In this highly visual and scroll friendly post from Daniele, you'll follow the evolution of monolith, to components, to VMs, to today's world of Kubernetes and cloud. Daniele writes: Kubernetes and Docker? What is the difference? Is it just a fad or are those two technologies here to stay? If you heard about the Docker and Kubernetes, but you aren’t sold on the idea and don’t see the point in migrating, this article is for you. 
Learn how you can leverage Kubernetes to reduce infrastructure costs and accelerate your software delivery.

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Justin Jackson justinjackson.ca

The hidden cost of bootstrapping

Justin Jackson shared some personal insights and lessons learned in this post — and quoted Des Traynor, co-founder of Intercom saying: A founder is spending 60 months of their best years in their startup (instead of their career). That is a substantial upfront investment; it’s like a seed round, but instead of money, it’s your life. And the bootstrappers dilemma... Can I get this to scale, while paying my bills, without burning out? This is why many founders end up raising venture capital.

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Will Gaybrick cnbc.com

Software developers are now more valuable to companies than money

Will Gaybrick, CFO at Stripe, wrote a short piece for CNBC last week that hit my radar. Will shares insights about how companies are worrying more about access to software developers than they are to capital constraints. ...a majority of companies say lack of access to software developers is a bigger threat to success than lack of access to capital. A recent study from Stripe and Harris Poll found that 61% of C-suite executives believe access to developer talent is a threat to the success of their business. Perhaps more surprisingly — as we mark a decade after the financial crisis — this threat was even ranked above capital constraints. Will goes on to say that given this revelation, companies are still misusing their most important resource. Too many developers are tied up in projects designed to prop up legacy systems and bad software, at a cost of $300 billion a year — $85 billion just dealing with bad code. Correctly deployed, the expertise of software developers could add $3 trillion to global GDP over the next decade.

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Kenneth Reitz kennethreitz.org

Reasons to use VS Code for Python development

Kenneth Reitz, well known in the Python community, creator of Requests, and a former Changelogger has been using VS Code for Python development for several months and is giving it the "should use" status. Kenneth writes on his personal blog: I've been using Visual Studio Code daily now (for Python development) for about six months — long enough to give it a thorough review. Before, I was using Sublime Text with a few plugins, which worked very well— but, I am continually shocked at just how good VS Code is, in comparison, and I'd like to share with you my observations / opinions...

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