Node.js Icon hackernoon.com

A crash course on Serverless with Node.js

If you've heard of serverless' virtues, but have never taken that first step toward trying it out, this crash course is for you. Here's how you might feel by the end: What a journey. You have now witnessed the transition from traditional web development into the serverless revolution. With these simple tools we now have everything we need to create awesome, scalable, and reliable applications. In my humble opinion, this is all still too much work for most of us to go through. AWS needs some serious competition in this space. Said competition is undoubtedly on the way.

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

The guide to modern observability challenges

Our friends at Rollbar are helping the developer community learn the insights necessary not just to identify and respond to problems after their app has been deployed, but to also trace issues to their source and fix things so those problems do not recur. Check out this free guide to modern observability. In this guide, we’ll explore: Modern observability challenges and why monitoring falls short Overview of tools and techniques to help you achieve observability How to implement best practices in your systems and development process

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Jaana B. Dogan (JBD) Medium

Want to debug latency?

What is latency? And how exactly do you debug it? Jaana writes on the Observability+ blog: In the recent decade, our systems got complex. Our average production environments consist of many different services (many microservices, storage systems and more) with different deployment and production-maintenance cycles. Measuring latency and being able to react to latency issues are getting equally complex as our systems got more complex. This article will help you how to navigate yourself at a latency problem and what you need to put in place to effectively do so.

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Floor DrEES Phusion Blog

Monitoring GitHub issue tickets through automated tagging

The Phusion team open sourced their customer support product –Support Central– which pulls in support requests from different channels, including GitHub Issues. GitHub tagging through Support Central allows our bootstrapped team to get a quick overview of which tickets are potentially blocked, rather than us periodically scrolling through the list and re-reading all the tickets. Perhaps your team will find it as useful as they do.

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Vim Icon github.com

Play PacVim to learn Vim

Jamal Moon writes in the readme: Vim is a great tool to write and edit code, but many people, including me, struggled with the steep learning curve. I did not find a fun, free way to learn about the vim commands in-depth, and thus, PacVim was born. Inspired by the classic, PacMan, PacVim is a game that'll give anyone plenty of practice with the vim commands while being a ton of fun to play. Download and build the game with macOS and Linux.

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Mozilla Icon Mozilla

A field guide to open source project archetypes [report]

The problem, as described by James Vasile: Open source is a broad term that encompasses many different types of projects. There is a wide range of open source approaches, and sometimes it helps to think through how your open source approach matches your goals, resources, and environment. In many places we look, we see open source used as a catch-all term to refer to every project. We don’t have a common vocabulary to discuss open source in ways that take account of important differences. Mozilla commissioned a report that attempts to establish that common vocabulary so we can describe open source projects with clarity. Although this report was tailored to advance open source strategies and project design within Mozilla, and with the organizations and communities we work with, we also believe that this challenge is not unique to us. We suspect there will be many other organizations, both commercial and non-commercial, who will benefit from the model. The resulting framework consists of 10 common archetypes. Click through to learn more.

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Prisma Icon www.prisma.io

Prisma raises $4.5M to build the GraphQL data layer for all databases

Big news from our friends at Graphcool, now Prisma. Today, we have some very exciting news to share: We've raised a $4.5 million seed round led by Kleiner Perkins and are rebranding to Prisma (from Graphcool). In this post we'd like to share our thoughts on Prisma today and our plans for the future. If you haven't yet, check out The Changelog #297: Prisma and the GraphQL data layer.

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Zack Whittaker www.zdnet.com

I asked Apple for all my data. Here's what was sent back.

Zack Whittaker writes for Zero Day: Apple gave me all the data it collected on me since I bought my first iPhone — in 2010. This is what has largely stood out to me in the ongoing discussion about what data the four have on me and how they use it... As insightful as it was, Apple's treasure trove of my personal data is a drop in the ocean to what social networks or search giants have on me, because Apple is primarily a hardware maker and not ad-driven, like Facebook and Google, which use your data to pitch you ads. Want to request your data? It takes just a few seconds...

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iOS Icon github.com

Windows 95 style UI components for iOS 😱

Feeling nostalgic for Windows 95? Blake Tsuzaki was: This is a little exploration into applying '90s-era design & principles into a modern platform with some primitive components. The assets and design metrics were (for the most part) taken from an actual installation of Windows 95. You may be wondering why all the effort? You'll find answers to that question and more in the README.

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Anil Dash Medium

What if JavaScript wins?

Very insightful post from Anil Dash about the impact of network effects on JavaScript and coding culture. Anil writes on his Medium: What this suggests is that JavaScript may be reaching escape velocity as a network, and as an ecosystem of related technologies. To be clear, there’s no winner-takes-all here — domain-specific languages will always have their uniquely valuable areas of focus. But for general-purpose coding? Everything from spreadsheet macros to Internet of Things hardware seems to default to having JavaScript be one of the primary ways to make things programmable.

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link Icon www.radiotopia.fm

‘Ways of Hearing’ podcast examines the effects of algorithms on digital music discovery

Ways of Hearing, a six-part series from Damon Krukowski (Galaxie 500, Damon and Naomi), explores “the nature of listening in our digital world”. While I recommend the entire series, episode five is especially interesting. Jump to 8:30 to hear Damon and Paul Lamere (Spotify) talk about music recommendation methods and the pitfalls of each. The thesis of this segment is that current algorithms are designed to help us find things that are similar to things they know we like, but what they don't do is help us find things that are unlike (and perhaps better than) anything we’ve experienced before.

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Diego Bernardes github.com

Flare – a service that notifies of HTTP endpoint changes

Flare listens to changes on HTTP endpoints and notify subscripted clients about the changes. It help reduce the pressure on APIs by avoiding the clients to do pooling requests to search for new/changed content and the need of the APIs to develop workers to notify the clients about the. Pitched as useful for microservice architectures, but could find lots of uses outside of that context too.

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Kye Hohenberger Avatar The React Podcast #9

Emotion

Kye Hohenberger is the author of the Emotion JavaScript library, a popular choice among React developers who prefer using CSS-in-JS to traditional CSS stylesheets. In this episode we discuss his work on Emotion including where he got the initial inspiration for the project and his motivation for creating it. We also discuss the future of the project and what may be in store for the future of CSS-in-JS.

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Sam Boyer sdboyer.io

An analysis of vgo

Sam Boyer kicked off a deep six-post series analyzing vgo. When Russ started releasing his series of blog posts introducing vgo in late February, I also put together some words. In that post, I indicated that I would be working on an assessment of vgo that I would make public as soon as I could. This, finally, is that assessment, although over the past couple months it has transformed into something more. Sam also set clear expectations for his release schedule: This is not my day job, so I won’t be publishing these rapid-fire, one day after another. I will release them as I finish them; as I write this, two more are nearly done. Also, check out Go Time #77: Dependencies and the future of Go with Russ Cox

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Matías Olivera warrior.js.org

WarriorJS – an exciting game of programming and Artificial Intelligence

A JavaScript game you play from the terminal: In WarriorJS, you wear the skin of a warrior climbing a tall tower to reach The JavaScript Sword at the top level. Legend has it that the sword bearer becomes enlightened in the JavaScript language, but be warned: the journey will not be easy. On each floor, you need to write JavaScript to instruct the warrior to battle enemies, rescue captives, and reach the stairs alive... Whether are new to programming or a JS guru, WarriorJS will put your skills to the test. Will you dare? Check out the gameplay docs to get a feel for things. This could be a lot of fun!

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