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GraphQL

GraphQL is a query language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling those queries with your existing data.
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Loren 🤓 blog.graphql.guide

Releasing The GraphQL Guide

John Resig and Loren Sands-Ramshaw first announced the beta of their GraphQL book (discussed here) nearly three years ago. After years of writing and re-writing, it’s now ready to be released. Loren had this to say in the linked announcement post:

This project has taken much longer than we expected, and the length of the book has wound up being much longer than we expected. We’d like to give a huge shout-out to our 740 beta readers who stuck with us through four major versions of the in-progress text.

The GraphQL Guide aims to be the most comprehensive guide to GraphQL, from a beginner introduction to advanced client and server topics.

GraphQL github.com

Mordred brings Gatsby's "source data from anywhere" idea to the rest of us

One of Gatsby’s greatest virtues is how it normalizes all data sources through its source plugin architecture. This is cool because it gives you a unified access layer for everything from the file system to 3rd-party APIs to headless CMSes.

Kevin Titor must’ve liked the idea enough that he’s bringing it to other frameworks that support static site generation (Next.js, Nuxt.js, Eleventy, etc.). The main thing missing from Mordred is a community creating plugins for popular CMSes and services; a great way to get involved!

JavaScript github.com

A Minecraft clone built entirely with JS

Having to open an additional app to play a game is sometimes too tiring. Therefore, I thought it’d be interesting to somehow implement Minecraft with javascript, essentially bringing the whole Minecraft game into the web. This not only takes away the tedious process of installing the game, it also brings the entire game to players within a couple clicks.

Words cannot describe how much I adore the thought that building this extremely ambitious piece of software was a better alternative to the tedious process of installing the game. 😆

A Minecraft clone built entirely with JS

JS Party JS Party #85

Building PizzaQL at the age of 16

Jerod, Mikeal, and Feross welcome Antoni Kepinski to the show to discuss his open source pizza ordering management web app. We talk about learning programming at a young age, how overwhelming web development can be these days, how Antoni decided which technologies to use, and more. This is a super fun conversation with many insights and takeaways for developers at every stage of their career.

GraphQL nilan.netlify.com

GraphQL trends in 2019

GraphQL is exploding in popularity, and I love to see it getting moved out of Facebook and becoming a clearly independent project. Neat to see all the stuff happening in the community around it.

The GraphQL Foundation announcement last year was another reassurance that GraphQL is here to stay, after Facebook granted full patent rights to all GraphQL users two years ago.

While the legal situation around GraphQL is in the clear now, 4 years after its open-source release, the best practices and developments surrounding the still-emerging technology are still rapidly evolving.

If you like this stuff, you might also like a couple episodes of JSParty. Episode #38 is an interview with John Resig about GraphQL, while episode #72 is a panel discussion on the evolution of state management, including GraphQL.

Manuel Vila github.com

Deepr – an alternative to GraphQL?

Manuel Vila:

What makes GraphQL so exciting is the ability to compose method calls, and Deepr is a way to achieve that and only that. Because everything else, we believe, would be better implemented somewhere else in the stack.

Deepr is being built by folks who’ve been using GraphQL for awhile, love it, and have some ideas about how things might be even better by changing some key decisions. Worth a look, for sure.

Bits and Pieces Icon Bits and Pieces

Should I use Apollo for GraphQL?

The author’s answer to that question is a resounding, ‘yes’.

The Apollo platform is an implementation of GraphQL that can transfer data between the cloud (server) to the UI of your app. In fact, Apollo builds its environment in such a way that we can use it to handle GraphQL on the client as well as the server side of the application.
In this post, I will present some of the great reasons why Apollo is considered to be one of the popular choices for using GraphQL in JavaScript-based apps.

He lays out what Apollo has to offer and then lists 6 advantages of using the Apollo Platform.

The Changelog The Changelog #322

There and back again (Dgraph's tale)

This week we talk with Manish Jain about Dgraph, graph databases, and licensing and re-licensing woes. Manish is the creator and founder Dgraph and we talked through all the details. We covered what a graph database is, the uses of a graph database, and how and when to choose a graph database over a relational database. We also talked through the hard subject of licensing/re-licensing. In this case, Dgraph has had to change their license a few times to maintain their focus on adoption while respecting the core ideas around what open source really means to developers.

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