Learn Icon

Learn

Learning to code, leveling up, building your skills. Expand your résumé and pursue a fulfilling developer career.
113 Stories
All Topics

Henning Jacobs github.com

Kubernetes failure/horror stories

Learn from other people’s fail stories. This is a compiled list of public Kubernetes failure stories. Why? Kubernetes is a fairly complex system with many moving parts. Its ecosystem is constantly evolving and adding even more layers (service mesh, …) to the mix. Considering this environment, we don’t hear enough real-world horror stories to learn from each other! This compilation of failure stories should make it easier for people dealing with Kubernetes operations (SRE, Ops, platform/infrastructure teams) to learn from others and reduce the unknown unknowns of running Kubernetes in production. For more information, see the blog post.

read more

Monica Lent monicalent.com

7 absolute truths I unlearned as junior developer

This is a great set of insights about being a developer and the software industry. It’s so easy when you’re first getting into something to have unrealistic expectations or idealistic beliefs. Articles like this help pull back the curtain and show what it’s really like. Author Monica Lent describes what a junior developer can get from this post: Maybe you’ll find something here you currently believe, and get inspired to learn more about it and why the topic is so multi-faceted. Or maybe you’ll find this post encouraging because you’re already so far ahead of where I was at your stage.

read more

Kevin Ball zendev.com

Top 5 skills to learn as a junior JavaScript developer

Inspired by JSParty #77, a breakdown of 5 of the top skills for junior JavaScript developers to learn. My personal favorite point is this one on the importance of looking for bigger picture patterns: One of the great things about front-end development in 2019 is that despite the abundance of frameworks, we’ve also started to see some big megatrends that are true across frameworks. This is good news for developers because it means that as you go deep in one framework you can still pick up skills that will translate to others if need be.

read more

Gergely Orosz blog.pragmaticengineer.com

Undervalued software engineering skills? Writing well.

Being able to communicate and write well often plays out to being a huge asset in a career. But how does that works for software engineers? Gergely Orosz writes on his personal blog: For software engineers, writing becomes the tool to reach, converse with and influence engineers and teams outside their immediate peers. Writing becomes essential to make thoughts, tradeoffs and decisions durable. Writing things downs makes these thoughts available for a wide range of people to read.

read more

Go Time Go Time #85

Go for beginners

How do beginners learn Go? This episode is meant to engage both non-Go users that listen to sister podcasts here on Changelog, or any Go-curious programmers out there, as well as encourage those that have started to learn Go and want to level up beyond the basics. On this episode we’re aiming to answer questions about how to learn Go, identify resources that are available, and where you can go to continue your learning journey.

read more

Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

Random Forests for complete beginners

Victor Zhou has been killin’ it lately with these explainers: In my opinion, most Machine Learning tutorials aren’t beginner-friendly enough. Last month, I wrote an introduction to Neural Networks for complete beginners. This post will adopt the same strategy, meaning it again assumes ZERO prior knowledge of machine learning. We’ll learn what Random Forests are and how they work from the ground up.

read more

Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Dave Cheney's "High Performance Go" workshop docs

If you haven’t attended the workshop directly, the next best thing is to learn indirectly by reading the workshop’s docs. The goal for this workshop is to give you the tools you need to diagnose performance problems in your Go applications and fix them. It’s licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license and the source is on GitHub.

read more

Damian Gryski github.com

Practices for writing high-performance Go

From writing and optimizing Go code to common gotchas with the Go standard library, Damian Gryski shared his thoughts on Go performance optimization and outlined best practices for writing high-performance Go code. Available in English, 中文, and Español. When and where to optimize — Every optimization has a cost. Generally this cost is expressed in terms of code complexity or cognitive load – optimized code is rarely simpler than the unoptimized version. But there’s another side that I’ll call the economics of optimization. As a programmer, your time is valuable. There’s the opportunity cost of what else you could be working on for your project, which bugs to fix, which features to add. Optimizing things is fun, but it’s not always the right task to choose. Performance is a feature, but so is shipping, and so is correctness.

read more

Sergiy Kukunin habr.com

The pros and cons of Elixir

In this short Q&A, Sergiy Kukunin, an Elixir expert, shares his thoughts on why Elixir is becoming so popular, its core advantages, and its drawbacks. Sergiy also shared this as a takeaway to getting started with Elixir. …the syntax of Elixir has some things in common with Ruby. The languages are entirely different, but it is always good to see symbols and elements you are used to. The simplest thing is to use some of the new Elixir-compatible web-development frameworks. The most popular web framework for Elixir is Phoenix. You should definitely give it a try, especially if you are used to using Ruby on Rails. This will simplify development while still making the app faster and more reliable.

read more

Simon Willison simonwillison.net

Running Datasette on Glitch

We talked with Simon Willison about Datasette on The Changelog #296. For the uninitiated, Datasette is an awesome tool for exploring and publishing data, and now you can play with it on Glitch. The worst part of any software project is setting up a development environment. It’s by far the biggest barrier for anyone trying to get started learning to code. I’ve been a developer for more than twenty years and I still feel the pain any time I want to do something new. Glitch is the most promising attempt I’ve ever seen at tackling this problem. This evening I decided to get Datasette running on it. I’m really impressed with how well it works, and I think Glitch provides an excellent environment for experimenting with Datasette and related tools.

read more

Chris Coyier CSS-Tricks

Using Netlify functions to send emails with a JAMstack-style site

How do you send email from a JAMstack-style site? Chris Coyer writes on CSS-Tricks: Let’s say you’re rocking a JAMstack-style site (no server-side languages in use), but you want to do something rather dynamic like send an email. Not a problem! That’s the whole point of JAMstack. It’s not just static hosting. It’s that plus doing anything else you wanna do through JavaScript and APIs. Here’s the setup…

read more

Founders Talk Founders Talk #63

Zero up-front costs for a CS education

What would be the impact on the world if a Computer Science education was available to you completely free of charge until you get a job in that field paying $50,000 or more? That’s the question that drives Austen Allred and the team behind Lambda School. Lambda School is a revolutionary new school that invests in its students and they completely align their interests with their students. Seems like a novel idea, right? But Austen’s path to Silicon Valley was where things began for him, so that’s where we’ll start today’s conversation.

read more

The Changelog The Changelog #342

From zero to thought leader in 6 months

We’re talking with Emma Wedekind about going from zero to thought leader in 6 months. We talk about the nuances of UX including the differences between an UX Designer and a UX Engineer, we touch on “the great divide”, and we talk about Coding Coach — the open source project and community that Emma and others are building to connect software developers and mentors all over the world.

read more

Go github.com

A roadmap to becoming a Go developer in 2019

The purpose of this roadmap is to give you an idea about the landscape. The road map will guide you if you are confused about what to learn next, rather than encouraging you to pick what is hip and trendy. You should grow some understanding of why one tool would be better suited for some cases than the other and remember hip and trendy does not always mean best suited for the job

read more

Ryan Palo assertnotmagic.com

Short circuiting in Bash

Learn from Ryan Palo about the super-powers of the “short-circuit” policy in Bash. In Bash, the && and || (AND and OR) operators work via a “short-circuit” policy. if [[ "$1" -gt 5 ]] && [[ "$1" -lt 10 ]]; then This checks the first condition. If the first condition is true, then there’s a possibility the whole thing could be true, so it checks the second condition. If the second condition is true, then the whole thing is true! However, if the first condition is false, then there’s no reason to check the second condition, because the whole thing could never possibly be true with the first one false.

read more

Thorsten Ball thorstenball.com

Learn more programming languages, even if you won't use them

Thorsten Ball writes on his personal blog: Different programming languages are good at different things and bad at others. Each one makes certain things easier and in turn others harder. Depending on what we want to do we can save ourselves a lot of work by choosing the language that makes solving the type of problem we’re facing the easiest. That’s one of the tangible, no-nonsense benefits of learning more languages. You put another tool in your toolbox and when the time comes you’re able to choose the best one. But I would go even one step further. I think it’s valuable to learn new programming languages even if — here it comes — you never take them out of the box. But why? Languages shape the way we think, each in their own peculiar way. That’s true for programming languages as well…

read more

Hamel Husain towardsdatascience.com

How to automate tasks on GitHub with machine learning for fun and profit

This is an explainer on how to build a GitHub App that predicts and applies issue labels using Tensorflow and public datasets. Hamel Husain writes: In order to show you how to create your own apps, we will walk you through the process of creating a GitHub app that can automatically label issues. Note that all of the code for this app, including the model training steps are located in this GitHub repository. See also: Issue Label Bot

read more

0:00 / 0:00