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React

React is an open source JavaScript library used for designing user interfaces.
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React djangostars.com

What and how to test with Jest and Enzyme

Testing React components may be challenging for beginners and experienced developers who have already worked with tests. It may be interesting to compare your own approaches with the ones we use in our project. In order to cover the codebase, you have to know which components must be tested and which code exactly in component should be covered.

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React reactjs.org

Create React App 2.0 is here

Here’s a few things that are new, but “don’t feel pressured to upgrade anything.” 🎉 More styling options: you can use Sass and CSS Modules out of the box. 🐠 We updated to Babel 7, including support for the React fragment syntax and many bugfixes. 📦 We updated to webpack 4, which automatically splits JS bundles more intelligently. 🃏 We updated to Jest 23, which includes an interactive mode for reviewing snapshots. …plus 7 more updates…

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sorrycc umijs.org

UmiJS – a pluggable, enterprise-level React app framework

Umi is based on routing, supports next.js-like conventional routing, and various advanced routing functions, such as routing-level on-demand loading. Then with a complete plugin system, covering every life cycle from source code to build product, umi is able to support various functional extensions and business needs, currently umi have almost 50+ plugins in both community and inside company.

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Keenan Szulik Tidelift

Is React's development "supported" by Facebook? That depends.

Everyone knows that React is one of the most popular JavaScript libraries for building user interfaces — and many users of React choose it because they think it’s supported by Facebook. But is it really? That depends on what you mean by React, and what you mean by support. Keenan Szulik writes on the Tidelift blog: Since its release in 2013, React has grown into a proper open source phenomenon … with more than 100,000 GitHub stars, over 300,000 dependent repositories, and more than 800 contributors. Facebook’s contributions to React and the JavaScript ecosystem around it are truly epic — the stuff of legend. But when we dive into the dependencies of the default create-react-app, only 24 of the 1,103 packages come from repositories in Facebook’s GitHub organizations. That’s less than 3% of the dependencies required to build the “Hello, World” app with create-react-app! So who supports React?

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Kelly github.com

A boilerplate web app to build your own SaaS product

You can use this web app as a boilerplate for building your own SaaS product. The app has many common SaaS features, so you can focus on the features that differentiate your product. As with most boilerplates, this is opinionated about its stack, which features: React, Material-UI, Next, MobX, Express, Mongoose, MongoDB, Typescript Here’s the full list of features and the live demo.

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Apple github.com

How far can JavaScript take us?

Tanner Villarete asked himself, “How far can JavaScript take us?” Then answered: Turns out, pretty dang far. This web app was my attempt at mimicking Apple’s iOS music app, and I think I’ve come pretty close! I have to admit, he did a pretty good job. The frontend is built on React and Redux. The backend? A Laravel-based API running on a Raspberry Pi! Here’s the live demo, but be nice because Raspberry Pi.

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Robin Wieruch robinwieruch.de

JavaScript fundamentals before learning React

Learn about the fundamentals of JavaScript to ease your learning/usage of React. After all my teachings about React, be it online for a larger audience or on-site for companies transitioning to web development and React, I always come to the conclusion that React is all about JavaScript. The following walkthrough is my attempt giving you an almost extensive yet concise list about all the different JavaScript functionalities to complement your React application.

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The Changelog The Changelog #306

The Great GatsbyJS

From open source project to a $3.8 million dollar seed round to transform Gatsby.js into a full-blown startup that’s building what’s becoming the defacto modern web frontend. In this episode, we talk with Jason Lengstorf about this blazing-fast static site generator, its building blocks and how they all fit together, the future of web development on the JAMstack (JavaScript + APIs), the importance of site performance, site rebuilds, getting started, and how they’re focused on building an awesome product and an awesome community.

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Ives van Hoorne Medium

CodeSandbox launched their dashboard and teams feature

I’ve been closely watching CodeSandbox and have been thoroughly impressed with the work Ives van Hoorne and the 75+ contributors have put into this online code editor for … React, Preact, Vue, and more. I’ve been thinking about getting Ives on Founders Talk to talk about the business model behind CodeSandbox. It seems to have this interesting self baked, pay what you want, Patron model to cover the expenses of CodeSandbox. Most of the features are free with limits, and being a “Patron” lifts those limits + extra features, and supports the costs and development efforts.

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Dan Abramov reactjs.org

Add React to any website

The documentation for “adding React to existing app” was updated this week by Dan Abramov to make the installation of React into any website a much simpler process. Dan writes in the opening paragraphs of the updated docs. React has been designed from the start for gradual adoption. You can use as little or as much React as you need. Perhaps you only want to add some “sprinkles of interactivity” to an existing page. React components are a great way to do that. The majority of websites aren’t, and don’t need to be, single-page apps. With a few lines of code and no build tooling, try React in a small part of your website. You can then either gradually expand its presence, or keep it contained to a few dynamic widgets. Here’s the GitHub issue that kicked things off which might provide a slight bit more context.

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Gabriel Peal Medium

React Native at Airbnb

This epic four part series from the Airbnb engineering blog showcases how React Native was used at Airbnb to enable their teams to move quickly and maintain a great developer experience. However, in the end, they decided to sunset React Native and focus on native — but their journey to that conclusion is well worth a read. Part 4: Sunsetting React Native — Although many teams relied on React Native and had planned on using it for the foreseeable future, we were ultimately unable to meet our original goals. In addition, there were a number of technical and organizational challenges that we were unable to overcome that would have made continuing to invest in React Native a challenge. As a result, moving forward, we are sunsetting React Native at Airbnb and reinvesting all of our efforts back into native. It’s not all bad though. 63% of their engineers would have chosen React Native again given the chance and 74% would consider React Native for a new project. Gabriel went on to say: React Native is progressing faster than ever. There have been over 2,500 commits in the last year and Facebook just announced that they are addressing some of the technical challenges we faced head-on. Even if we will no longer be investing in React Native, we’re excited to continue following its developments. For a different perspective read Should we use React Native? — a follow-up post to this four part series.

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React docz.site

Docz – it has never been so easy to document your things!

Docz’ high-level principles give you an idea of what they’re all about: Zero config and easy. No unnecessary build steps with confusing setups. Blazing fast. Always use the fastest things to build our tools. Easy to customize. Create something that will be easy to use and customize. MDX Based. Have the best standard to write documents. Pluggable. Plugins are the best choice when you need to be custom and flexible. Watch the demo video on the homepage to see just how nice this tool is to use.

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Justin Sisley github.com

mostly – a full stack web app starter kit built on Node.js

mostly’s purpose is to serve as a lightweight, easy-to-comprehend starting point, with a focus on providing a great developer experience while helping you get high quality and maintainable web applications deployed rapidly. It uses Express for the server and React for the client. Worth a look if you’re starting up a new web project. I dig this point about it: Nothing is hidden, nothing is magical, and all of the “plumbing” is accessible and simple.

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Prisma prisma.io

Prisma raises $4.5M to build the GraphQL data layer for all databases

Big news from our friends at Graphcool, now Prisma. Today, we have some very exciting news to share: We’ve raised a $4.5 million seed round led by Kleiner Perkins and are rebranding to Prisma (from Graphcool). In this post we’d like to share our thoughts on Prisma today and our plans for the future. If you haven’t yet, check out The Changelog #297: Prisma and the GraphQL data layer.

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